Excursions: Hello Kitty at EMP

One of the best parts of living in Seattle is the endless list of events and activities available on any given day. If you're looking for something to do (safe from the Seattle rain) I highly suggest visiting the EMP! The EMP, also known as the Experience Music Project, is a nonprofit museum "dedicated to the ideas and risk-taking that fuel contemporary popular culture."

On Friday, November 13th the EMP welcomed one of it's brightest exhibits to date: Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty.

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Filled with pieces dating back to Hello Kitty's creation 40 years ago, the exhibit features bright walls and a soundtrack of upbeat tunes.  Beyond the vintage school supplies, clothing and kitchenware, museum-goers learn about how Hello Kitty became an icon and the role she’s played in bringing together people from around the world.

While I loved seeing how HK grew to be a global brand, my favorite part of the exhibit had to be seeing her impact on fashion. Pieces worn by A-list celebrities like Katy Perry, Paris Hilton and Lady Gaga were on display. Check out these incredible designs from America's Next Top Model: British Invasion.

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The looks took more than three months to make and included pieces of Hello Kitty merchandise ranging from band aids to slippers and plush toys. 

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Since it was the exhibit's opening weekend, the Hello Kitty Cafe was parked just outside. The menu was limited so I wouldn't suggest skipping a meal for this cafe, but they had several sweet treats to snack on. Food options included macarons and small cakes while coffee mugs and water bottles were available for those looking for a reusable item.

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The one piece of advice I would give to anyone interested in visiting the EMP would be to give yourself at least two or three hours to enjoy multiple exhibits. While my friends and I took a few minutes to quickly peruse pieces of Nirvana's history, there were several other exhibits I wish we could have seen. 

Want to learn more about the EMP or current exhibits? Visit empmuseum.org.